Little Free Library catalog #2 – Willy St. Co-op

This is the Little Free Library I peruse most often: it’s right outside the Willy Street Co-op on the east side of the isthmus in Madison. The little library box-on-a-stick is the typical model: less fancy than the two-story fancy one in my last LFL post.

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When I checked this one out, on May 15, to be exact, it contained quite a variety of reading material. Not surprising at all, considering the fact that it’s located in one of Madison’s more eccentric neighborhoods (local trends include Tibetan prayer flags, front-yard veggie gardens, and hanging your baby swing from your front porch so you can sit and chat with your neighbors while your baby sails out over the flowerbeds). What was surprising was the fact that this Little Free Library has a blisteringly fast turnover. I walk past it at least once a day, and every day the selection is different. The books I found in it on May 15 had all been replaced within a few days. Does the C0-op replenish them (there is also a “take-a-book, leave-a-book” shelf inside the Co-op store), or is it all passersby?

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 Here are the details:
5 issues of Spin magazine

The Amateur American, James Saunders Elmore

Simon & Schuster handbook for writers, Lynn Quitman Troyka

The challenge of local feminisms : women’s movements in global perspective 

Pretty little things

Reversible errors

Human natures : genes, cultures, and the human prospect

Next up in this series, a Little Free Library on (two) wheels.

Immune system speed-dating

My recent move to Wisconsin has had an unexpected side effect: I have caught three vicious viruses since we got here, including the one I am now fighting, a scant three weeks after I recovered from the last one!

So, my plans for heavy-duty reading of Bowling Avenue have been put on hold. I did read, over the weekend, a biography of Margaret Sanger, which I can’t comment on yet because I’m pretty sure there’s a rule somewhere saying you shouldn’t write about birth control, feminism and eugenics in a public forum if you’re pretty sure you have a fever. I also read, as usual, the New York Times, and particularly enjoyed Margaret Atwood’s “Hello Martians, This is America.”

And somewhere in there I read a free copy of Cook’s Country magazine which arrived unsolicited in my mailbox, dropped there, it seems, specifically to taunt me, an anemic in a vegetarian household, with recipes for pulled pork, roast beef, and several items containing bacon.

For the most part, though, I’ve been doing this:

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Tea with lemon, knitting (a plain shawl with moss stitch edging, out of the lovely Lorna’s Laces Solemate,) and lots of laptop time. In particular, I’m enjoying a systematic reading of one of my favourite blogs: Needled: by Kate Davies, interesting to anyone with an interest in knitting, reading, feminist history, textile history (including the history of bathing suits, the topic of Kate’s latest issue of Textisles, her e-magazine), epublishing, hiking, stroke recovery, home-brewed beer, Scotland, and dogs. In other words, a fair cross-section of those reading this blog, I’m pretty sure . . .